yamaha reface cp

Hands on with Yamaha reface CP

yamaha reface cpSo next up in my testing marathon was the reface cp.

Quick spec check:

128 voice, 3 Octave High Quality mini key keybed, SCM Sound Engine (Same as CP1), 127 Levels Dynamic Response so no gaps! 6 sound types (Rd1, Rd2, Wurly, Clav, Toy and CP). Rd1 & 2 are really Rhodes Piano although of course Yamaha can’t say that, we can though. Wurly is obviously Wurlitzer, Clav is self explanatory as is Toy and of course CP which gives the unit it’s name.

Controls left to right : Volume, Octave +-, Type (to select sounds), Drive (Overdrive) and then we come to the effects. Split into four sections each housing two effects which are switched between via a rather nice little chrome flip switch. So first up you have Tremolo/Wah with Depth and Rate rotary knobs. Chorus/Phaser with Depth & Speed, Digital/Analogue Delay with Depth and Time and lastly, Reverb with Depth control. You can use four effects at once and they are tailored to the sound you selected so as an example for one sound it could be Stereo and another it might be Mono. Effects are very high quality.

Have to say, out of the four reface models I tested, the CP is definitely my favourite and that came as something of a surprise given it has just six sounds to choose from. I thought I would have been a dx guy but no, here I am wishing the CP didn’t have to go back to Yamaha but alas go it must.

With just 6 sound types to choose from, you may think the CP is indeed rather limited but, in combination with the rather wonderful effects you can produce a lot more than you would expect. Also because the keybed is of such high quality combined with 128 voice polyphony and 127 levels of dynamic response you can really ‘dig in’ and play enthusiastically. reface may have been labelled a ‘toy’ by some but Yamaha’s attention to build quality shines through and these things can really take a hammering!

The Spectral Component Modeling sound engine which is a sort of hybrid sample/modeling based system really adds depth and realism to the sound. Even through the built in speakers, which I believe are bass reflex? the reface cp sounds great. Given it will run for 5-6 hours on batteries I can see a lot of people taking this mobile. I must admit I had my doubts about that aspect of reface at first but once you get to play around with one for a while, walking from room to room with it, sitting on a comfy sofa with one on your lap and then knocking out tunes you might not otherwise have come up with you do start to change your way of thinking.

Likewise as many on this forum will know, I have never been a fan of mini keys. I was dead set against them and thought they had no place on a serious musical keyboard. Well I have to admit to being something of a convert. Having had each reface model sitting very comfortably on my desk between my imac and it’s keyboard I have to say it was just about the perfect arrangement. The sheer convenience of the whole set up meant I played far more in the few weeks I have had reface than I did previously with my full size keyboards.

I’m not saying I would choose mini keys for my ‘only’ keyboard but, with sound and built quality like this it definitely has it’s place.

Another thing I like about the reface cp is the control panel. It looks very much like an electric stage piano. It has a very ‘classic’ look to it but without the smell of stale beer and fags, although I am sure a few people I know would be very comfortable adding those items into the mix ;)

Bottom line is, would I buy a reface cp? I think out of the four models I would indeed be tempted to part with cash for one. Would I part with the current street price of £289? well that’s another matter entirely. Were there a deal to be done though, I think I could be tempted ;)

For more info visit :
http://uk.yamaha.com/en/products/music- … reface_cp/

Follow the discussion on the forum here